MacGill Summer School

I’m just back from Glenties, in Donegal. I spent a few days at the MacGill Summer School. The School is an annual event, and has been running since 1981. If you wish, you can watch every session on the Donegal County Council website here. I saw most of the sessions form the Wednesday evening to the last session on Friday. MacGill drew a certain amount of criticism this year. One letter in the Examiner described it “nothing more than a ‘talking shop’ or junket for ‘has beens’ or ‘wannabes’. It offers nothing constructive to help solve problems of this country.” In a piece in the business section of the Irish Times Caroline Madden suggests that for the cynical it might be “a talking shop where navel-gazing represents the chief activity”. I don’t altogether agree.

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Portaloise – the HIQA report

Mother and Child - Photo by Aaron Kraus CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Mother and Child – Photo by Aaron Kraus (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The widely leaked HIQA report into Portaloise Hospital is out now. The various pieces can be downloaded from www.hiqa.ie

The context is well known, serious failing in maternity care in Portlaoise, identified by a great team of reporters from the RTE programme PrimeTime investigates, and detailed in a very clear, and very explicit,  report from Tony Holohan, the CMO.

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DOCTRID conference – selected notes

I’m just back from the fourth DOCTRID conference  in Belfast. DOCTRID is the research arm of the Daughters of Charity. It funds and oversees research in the field of ID and autism by bringing experts from medicine, social science, education, computer science and engineering together. DOCTRID was established in 2010 as an international, interdisciplinary coalition of universities, service providers dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) and autism through research and technology.

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Primary care and the new GP contract

The new GP contract  was the subject of much debate and discussion at the IMO AGM over the weekend, and the members have supported it. There are more details of the draft contract on the IMO website, but all seem to be in the members-only section. (As I’m a member I can read them, but I don’t think it appropriate to share more widely). The council of the other main GP representative body, the  NAGP, met on Sunday, and are reported as having rejected it unanimously. What is going on?

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Adoption and same-sex couples – some evidence

In the light of recent discussion on the Child and Family Relationships Bill, and some issues raised by the referendum on marriage equality, I have looked at recent evidence on the outcomes for children adopted by same-sex parents. The short version is that there is no evidence for worse outcomes in children adopted by same-sex couples. My judgement is that there is enough evidence to support equality in adoption for same-sex, and heterosexual couples. I believe that the onus is on those who argue against allowing adoption by same-sex couples, to to produce the evidence to support their case. In a future post I will look at the wider evidence on children raised by same-sex couples.

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‘On Wednesday We Wear Pirate Hats’ The BT Young Scientist &Technology Exhibition and the state of younger people in Ireland

I was lucky enough to be one of the judges at the BT Young Scientist’s exhibition in Dublin in the first week of January. This gave me two rather different opportunities to see Irish school children. First, I got to meet the people who put in projects. These included the eventual winners, Ian O’Sullivan and Eimear Murphy from Cork, and about forty other people, all aged between 12 and 18, whose group projects, all entered into the Social and Behavioural Sciences section of the exhibition, I got to judge. (Every single project gets judged three times, independently, and those in the running for prizes are reviewed by further judges.)

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HSE Service Plan 2015

The HSE Service plan is out today, and you can read it here. I’ve just finished reviewing it for the Pat Kenny show on Newstalk.

Some key points

  • Some money to reduce waiting lists in acute hospitals
  • Some money to support moving patients out of hospitals in to home care or long term care
  • Hospital groups to happen
  • Palliative care service in the Midlands for the first time
  • Better access to diagnostics for GPs – ultrasound now, more services in 2016
  • Some increase in spending on disability services and mental health
  • 0.7% increase in spending from 2014 outcome
  • New use of balanced scorecard methods to hold managers to account
  • More investment in ICT

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